From A to B

Puget Sound, like many U.S. metropolises, suffers from traffic congestion. There are just too many people driving too many cars on too few roads. When we set out for work each morning, we inevitably join the congealed goo that clogs our freeways. Getting to and from Seattle involves one of the worst commutes in the country.

A big reason for this is the lack of alternative transportation. We are too sparsely distributed to rely on bicycles, and even if we are intrepid enough to bike, we must share the roads with giant SUVs and trucks—an iffy proposition. Buses must also compete with thousands of other vehicles, which does not make commute times any less. But the absence of trains is the largest factor in our region’s transportation mess.

The King County Executive, Dow Constantine, announced that residents of the area should not expect relief to come via more roads and freeway lanes.

With the three-county region’s population expected to grow by 1 million over the next 25 years, Constantine said transit is the only solution that can move a lot of people — 16,000 an hour, or the equivalent of 14 new lanes on Interstate 5.

The proposal going to the region’s voters this fall, dubbed ST3 (Sound Transit 3), will ask residents to pay a combined $50 billion extra to serve the citizens of Everett and elsewhere. The Sound Transit agency estimates that the average Puget Sound household would pay about $392/year, or a bit over a dollar a day.

But Republicans, as a rule, loathe anything public and especially anything to do with public rails. They believe, in their idiocy, that rails and buses undermine the freedom to roam and, though they do not admit it, wreak havoc on the environment in their libertarian pursuits. So Republicans, as a rule, oppose any collective efforts to solve aggregate problems, and transportation is the mother of all aggregate problems.

Meanwhile, the United States continues to fall behind other countries in just about all categories of social and economic wellbeing, save for our One Percent, who reign supreme throughout the world. Consider this chart on high-speed rail, based on data collected by GoEuro, a website devoted to transportation.

high speed rail

Notice where the U.S. ranks. That’s right, next to last in population coverage and dead last in costs per kilometer traveled. The GoEuro website includes a table showing high-speed rail either planned or already under construction. Again, look at The Americas.

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The entire Western Hemisphere has just three percent of the world’s total of rail lines under construction (most of that the California project) and under 10 percent of the total planned. Current usage of existing high-speed rail is roughly two percent of all the global high-speed rail now operating.

Against Europe and Asia we suck. For you Trumpites out there, know that American cannot be made great again by cutting taxes on the wealthy or building a big wall, however beautiful. More helpful would be to get Americans moving again, quickly and efficiently, along with their goods and services. Asians and Europeans understand this.

Ben Adler, writing for Grist, offers his thoughts:

GoEuro notes dryly that the “USA and Russia, both once in competition during the Space Race,” are now struggling just to move their citizens around swiftly on land. Well, Russia is actually in 15th place, so unlike the space race, we’re losing this one. Well-known rail leaders Japan, South Korea, China, and France are the top four nations, in that order. Spain, which is persistently economically troubled, ranks fifth. None of these countries has as high a GDP per capita as the U.S., so our problem isn’t lack of resources, it’s lack of political will.

Ah, politics. The necessary evil.